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The world's population

Many different sources today predict that the world’s population will grow to and surpass the 9 billion mark by the year 2050. The more our population grows the more difficult it becomes to properly address issues like resource management and food security. Studying population trends and movements is an important factor that needs to be considered.

Food IN-security

There are 7 billion people on Earth. Although the current global food production is enough to feed us all, there are 1 billion people suffering from hunger. The dark red on this map indicates where one person in three suffers from undernourishment, which is quite serious. As you can see the most affected countries are in Sub Saharan Africa. Africa is overall the region most affected by food insecurity and malnutrition.

The JRC soil atlas

More than 20 years of collaboration between European soil scientists has resulted in the publication by the European Commission of the first ever 'Soil Atlas of Europe' in 2008. The JRC is at the heart of this collaborative effort. Here on this map you can see many of the world’s soil types represented as different colours. They are extensive. Can you guess how many types of soils are mapped here?

Travel time to major cities

This JRC global accessibility map measures urbanisation from a new perspective - travel time to major cities. It shows how 90% of the world's population can access major cities within 48 hours - the remaining 10%, which we can define as wilderness, is becoming ever more reachable. This can be good for providing people with the essentials for a decent life but, at the same time can be a burden on our Earth's fragile ecosystem.

Digital society

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The internet

Internet topology is the network arrangement of various elements of a computer system. Physical topology is the placement of the various components of a network, while logical topology illustrates how data flows within a network. Distances between nodes, physical interconnections, transmission rates, or signal types may differ between two networks, yet their topologies may be identical. This is an Internet topology map.

Economic and Monetary Union

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Travel time to major cities

The world is shrinking: cheap flights, large scale commercial shipping, and expanding road networks… Only 10% of land area is remote or more than 48 hours from a large city. Global travel and international trade and just two of the forces that have reshaped our world. This map, developed by the European Commission and the World Bank, captures this connectivity and the concentration of economic activity.

Energy and transport

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Travel time to major cities

This JRC global accessibility map measures urbanisation from a new perspective - travel time to major cities. It shows how 90% of the world's population can access major cities within 48 hours - the remaining 10%, which we can define as wilderness, is becoming ever more reachable. This can be good for providing people with the essentials for a decent life but, at the same time can be a burden on our Earth's fragile ecosystem.

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CO2 emissions

Despite continued efforts to reduce emissions of harmful air pollutants, air pollution remains a concern. The JRC supports EU air pollutant and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction polices by measuring, assessing, and checking emission data in maps like this one, with the online tool Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR). This database can determine emissions for the world in a comparable and consistent manner.

Global emissions

Even though Europe has significantly cut emissions in recent decades, air pollution continues to damage human health and ecosystems. The impact of changing source legislation on air quality needs to be understood and monitored. The JRC runs atmospheric research facilities and operates models and tools to analyse the impact of European policies and international protocols.

BIOPAMA

BIOPAMA (June 2011-July 2016) stands for Biodiversity and Protected Areas (PAs) Management in the Africa, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) regions. The objective of this project, managed by the JRC and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), is to enhance existing institutions and networks by building their capacity to strengthen policy and to implement well informed decisions on biodiversity conservation and PAs management.

Monitoring forests

The JRC is a main provider of forestry information and of assessments of EU and global forest resources. We investigate the role of forests in providing ecological services and in supporting economic activities, taking into account competing needs and the impact of climate change.

Floods

The European and Global Flood Awareness Systems (EFAS and GLOFAS) produce daily information on ongoing and forecasted floods in Europe and across the globe. Research is ongoing to verify the results and to improve the systems. Results, like what you see on this map, are already used to support the European Civil Protection during important flood crises in Europe and the developing world. This is an example of recent forecasts of accumulated rainfall and probabilities of exceeding critical rainfall thresholds.

Fire risk

Due to Climate Change, frequencies of extreme weather events such as floods, droughts and heat waves are expected to increase in the future. The JRC works on predicting and making impact assessments of such events. Here in this map you can see how scientists monitor fires and determine what areas are at risk.

The Earth's surface

Advanced observation techniques measure environmental change, often driven by the demand for natural resources. This Global Land Cover Map is a reference baseline to measure changes such as deforestation, agricultural development and production, urbanisation. Did you know that every 3 seconds, the equivalent of a football field area of forest is lost? That also means, every 4 days an area the size of the Province of Varese is changed from forest to other land use.

Travel time to major cities

This JRC global accessibility map measures urbanisation from a new perspective - travel time to major cities. It shows how 90% of the world's population can access major cities within 48 hours - the remaining 10%, which we can define as wilderness, is becoming ever more reachable. This can be good for providing people with the essentials for a decent life but, at the same time can be a burden on our Earth's fragile ecosystem.

The world's population

Many different sources today predict that the world’s population will grow to and surpass the 9 billion mark by the year 2050. The more our population grows the more difficult it becomes to properly address issues like resource management and food security. Studying population trends and movements is an important factor that needs to be considered.

Health and consumer protection

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The world's population

Many different sources today predict that the world’s population will grow to and surpass the 9 billion mark by the year 2050. The more our population grows the more difficult it becomes to properly address issues like resource management and food security. Studying population trends and movements is an important factor that needs to be considered.

Innovation and growth

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The international dimension of nuclear safeguards

At an international level, the nuclear safeguards inspections worldwide are implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the JRC contributes to these activities in terms of scientific and technical support.

Euratom safeguards

Under the Euratom Treaty (1957), the Euratom Safeguards is implemented by European Commission and applies to all 28 EU Member States.

R&D for better safeguards

JRC contributions to research and development (R&D) have been fundamental in assuring better nuclear safeguards. For 55 years the JRC has been providing example technologies to safeguarding authorities in various fuel cycle domains such as enrichment, fuel fabrication, reprocessing facilities and final disposal.

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Tsunami

The only worldwide automatic tsunami alert system has been developed, and is operated by the JRC. We are now working on a consolidated European mechanism. The tsunami that you are watching on the Globe right now is the tsunami that occurred in the Pacific Ocean in March 2011. Our scientists were able to simulate the tsunami on a map by plotting the levels of energy detected in the water. The areas in yellow are the highest levels of energy, red are medium levels and the areas in light green are the lowest.

Monitoring maritime traffic

Developing the potential of the European maritime economy and securing prosperous coastal communities, sustainable fisheries, a stable supply of seafood and healthy seas requires an integrated approach. Our work that contributes to the EU’s Blue Growth Strategy includes activities in a variety of areas relating to environment, fisheries, transport, energy, and security. On this map you can observe a state-of-the-art system that the JRC has developed in support of the EU Maritime Security Strategy.

Earthquakes

Rapid collection, analysis and distribution of information on disasters saves lives. You will now see the pattern of earthquakes over a 7 year period, as collected and distributed to users via GDACS (The Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System). Dots on the map represent major earthquakes sized according to their scale and colour coded for their impact - green is low, orange medium and red indicates major humanitarian disasters.

Global disaster alert

The JRC has developed systems to support the work of the EU’s Emergency Response Coordination Centre (ERCC), operated by the Commission’s service for humanitarian aid and civil protection (ECHO). One example is GDACS – the Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System.

Standards

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Air traffic

On this map you can see what the traffic in the sky looks like, on a typical day. Take a look at all the flights. There are over 90,000 scheduled commercial flights every day, and each year over 2 billion people travel by plane. This means that are airports are very busy and even if you never thought about it before a lot of science goes into making our airports safe.

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Dynamic Earth

Our Earth is over 4 billion years old. 70% is covered by salt water ocean, and about 12% of the Earth’s surface is suitable for humans to live on. The Earth hasn’t always looked like it does now – in the past 600 million years the Earth’s surface has shifted dramatically, as you are now witnessing. Many of the JRC’s activities are devoted to studying the Earth system – its physical properties and processes, the effects of these on our daily lives and how we in turn are changing the Earth system.

The world's population

Many different sources today predict that the world’s population will grow to and surpass the 9 billion mark by the year 2050. The more our population grows the more difficult it becomes to properly address issues like resource management and food security. Studying population trends and movements is an important factor that needs to be considered.

Satellite images

The Globe has set the scene for displaying science for centuries. The JRC uses satellite imagery to work on many different areas of research. From farming to monitoring the oceans and air to network building and managing natural disasters and security issues and more; satellites and their images are used everywhere, every day.

Natural planet

Today many areas of science rely on geographic information systems and satellite images, and composites of those various images, to study global issues. This has become an important and innovative way to communicate science on an international scale.

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